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Effective Tips for Reducing Computer Vision Symptoms

In this day and age, you simply can’t escape the glow of smartphones, tablets, computers, and TVs. Unfortunately, this can have some very damaging effects on your eyes.

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After a full day in front of screens, many people report experiencing symptoms such as eye strain, light sensitivity, and headaches. All of these have been linked to extended screen time, and are often referred to as computer vision syndrome.

These symptoms can be especially bad for those with myopia (nearsightedness), hyperopia (farsightedness), or astigmatism.

Since many of us need these screens for school and work, we don’t have the luxury of significantly reducing our daily screen time. Nonetheless, there are still many creative ways to reduce the painful and uncomfortable effects of extended digital screen usage.

Here are four effective ways to minimize eye fatigue and other computer vision symptoms.

Ask about ways to reduce blue light exposure

One of the most common unseen problems with digital screens is blue light exposure. Though blue light is natural, and even healthy for your eyes in moderation, excessive amounts like that experienced from long hours on screens can cause issues with sleeping and result in strain on your retina that has been linked to an increased risk of long-term retina damage.

One easy and inexpensive way to reduce the effects of blue light on your eyes is by asking your eye doctor during your annual eye exam about anti-glare and anti-blue light coatings for your glasses. Many electronics stores will also sell blue light filters for your computer and other digital screens.

Try the “20-20-20 Rule.

Research shows that spending long hours concentrating on computer work significantly decreases the number of blinks you take per minute, leading to dry, red, itchy eyes.

Try the “20-20-20 Break and Blink Rule” to help increase the number of blinks you take while working. Every 20 minutes in front of your computer, look at an object 20 ft away from you for 20 seconds and blink. This gives your eyes a chance to “reset” before continuing to work and helps prevent eye strain, dry eyes, and headaches.

Take Eye Health Supplements.

Eye health supplements contain healthy and essential nutrients and vitamins and minerals that can help reduce the harmful effects of digital screens. Zeaxanthin and Lutein are anti-oxidants found in many supplements that can’t be naturally produced in the body and help protect the macula from blue light damage.

High-quality eye health supplements can reduce computer vision symptoms, as well as minimize the long-term risk of developing eye conditions such as cataracts and macular degeneration.

Lubricate your eyes.

Naturally, our eyes lubricate themselves by blinking. However, because of the reduced rate of blinking mentioned earlier, eyes tend to dry out faster while concentrating on digital screens.

One way to combat this is by the use of lubricating drops or artificial tears. Though over-the-counter eye drops are easy to obtain, it’s always better to speak to your eye doctor to get the best advice on what will help you the most. In many cases, prescription eye drops or artificial tears will be much more effective.

For more information on how you can reduce eye strain and other symptoms of computer vision syndrome, speak to our eye care professionals at today!

Meyerland Family Eye Care, your Houston eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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Why Are Dilated Eye Exams So Important?

Riz Eye Care Dilated Eye Exam near you in Houston, Texas

Having your eyes dilated during an eye exam may seem like a nuisance. But when you consider the benefits of a dilated eye exam, the temporary blurred vision and sensitivity to light that typically follow are definitely worth it.

What Are Dilated Eye Exams?

At some point during a comprehensive eye exam, your optometrist will shine a bright light into your eyes to examine the back of your eye, called the retina. The problem is that bright light causes the size of the pupil’s opening to shrink, which makes it hard for the optometrist to see a large portion of the retina.

That’s why eye doctors apply special eye drops in each eye to keep the pupils open. A dilated pupil allows for a much more accurate assessment of your eye’s structures, including the focusing lens, blood vessels and tissues at the back of the eye called the retina, as well as the optic nerve and macula.

Dilating the eyes makes it easier for your optometrist to detect the following conditions and diseases:

It’s important to note that many of these conditions can develop without noticeable symptoms, until they cause vision loss at which point treatment may be more challenging, making dilated eye exams all the more crucial.

The Dilation Process

First, your eye doctor will apply eye drops to each eye to trigger dilation of the pupil. Your eyes should be fully dilated about 10-20 minutes later.

Your eyes will remain dilated for 4-6 hours, and during this time you may be sensitive to light. That’s because the larger pupil allows more light than usual to enter the eye. Many patients find it more comfortable to wear sunglasses until their eyes return to normal.

Reading and using a computer may be difficult with dilated eyes, and your vision may be blurred. Some patients report feeling a tightening sensation in their eyelids, or headaches.

Dilated eye exams are a crucial part of keeping your eyes healthy. To schedule your comprehensive eye exam, call Riz Eye Care in Houston today!

Riz Eye Care, your Houston eye doctor for eye exams and eye care

Alternatively, book an appointment online here CLICK FOR AN APPOINTMENT

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At what age should one have a dilated eye exam?

You should have your dilated eye exam no matter your age. Most eye doctors will dilate a new patient at their first exam regardless of age to get a baseline of their retinal health.

Will I be able to return to work after a dilated eye exam?

Everyone reacts differently, so it’s hard to tell. If your job requires you to focus on small print or detail, it may be challenging. Typing and writing may also be difficult with dilated pupils. To be on the safe side, book your appointment at the end of your work day, clear your schedule after your eye exam and only plan to do activities which aren’t visually demanding.